Additives

It is possible to use almost any type of nanomaterial as an additive in the synthesis of materials and products in order to improve their properties. Nowadays, the manufacture and use of nanomaterials and nanostructures in the coating and pigments industry in general can be tailored to the specific needs of the various applications. Novel nano-based coatings are widely used, for instance, to functionalize surfaces, to provide protection against corrosion and dirt, to prevent biological soiling or to create attractive designs by special colour effects. Nanomaterials are used to improve their processability and colour quality in ink formulations.
Making composite fabric with nano-sized particles or fibers allows an improvement of fabric properties without a significant increase in weight, thickness, or stiffness. This is very useful in sporting clothes and sporting goods, whose performance can be drastically improved by reducing stiffness or weight.
 
 
Application Product or article Improved properties Nanomaterials
Coatings and paints Photoactive coatings
Self-cleaning paints
Antimicrobial paints
Car paints
Transparent coatings
Durability
Self-cleaning
Scratch resistance
Antimicrobial
Weather resistance
Abrasion resistance
Titanium oxide
Synthetic amorphous silica
Silver
Iron oxide
Phthalocyanine pigments
Azo pigments
Inks and toners Inkjet printing inks
Tatto inks
Conductive inks
Viscoelastic properties Carbon black
Silver
Phthalocyanine pigments
Azo pigments
Fabrics, textiles and apparel Baby textiles coatings
Beach clothes
Waterproof clothes
Spill proof tableclothes
Antimicrobial
UV protection
Higher abrasion resistance
Silver
Titanium dioxide
Synthetic amorphous silica
Aluminium oxide
Carbon nanotubes
Sports equipment Tennis rackets
Golf clubs
Bicycle frames
Stiffness
Reduced weight
Titanium dioxide
Carbon nanotubes

That’s being said now on nano & additives

  • As future...

    ...nanotube electrodes coated with titanium disulfide deposited one atomic layer at a time. The magnified inset shows individual titanium disulfide coated carbon nanotube electrodes. (Image: Berkeley Lab) Capacitors are electrical components that store energy and are widely used in electronic devices. Typical supercapacitors, named for their ability to store more electrical charge than standard capacitors, store charge “physically” through the buildup of charges on their surfaces. […]

  • As future...

    ...nanotube electrodes coated with titanium disulfide deposited one atomic layer at a time. The magnified inset shows individual titanium disulfide coated carbon nanotube electrodes. (Image: Berkeley Lab) Capacitors are electrical components that store energy and are widely used in electronic devices. Typical supercapacitors, named for their ability to store more electrical charge than standard capacitors, store charge “physically” through the buildup of charges on their surfaces. […]

  • Inverse Opal...

    ...nanotube (CNT)–polymer ... Abstract | Full Text HTML | PDF w/ Links | Hi-Res PDF Hydrophilic/Hydrophobic Composite Shape-Shifting Structures ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces Zhao, Kuang, Yuan, Qi, and Fang2018 10 (23), pp 19932–19939 Abstract: Swelling-induced shape transformation has been widely investigated and applied to the design and fabrication of smart polymer devices, such as soft robotics, biomedical devices, and origami patterns. Previous shape-shifting designs […]

  • Making quantum...

    ...graphene stops attracting additional atoms out of the vapor when the film has grown to be only a few atoms away from the surface. In comparison, even the thinnest layer of water on your bathroom mirror—which is formed by many much more powerful forces than just the quantum-scale effects of van der Waals force—would be “in the neighborhood of 109 atoms thick,” says Del Maestro; that’s 1,000,000,000 atoms thick. Applied wetness Engineering a surface where this […]

  • Making quantum...

    ...graphene stops attracting additional atoms out of the vapor when the film has grown to be only a few atoms away from the surface. In comparison, even the thinnest layer of water on your bathroom mirror—which is formed by many much more powerful forces than just the quantum-scale effects of van der Waals force—would be “in the neighborhood of 109 atoms thick,” says Del Maestro; that’s 1,000,000,000 atoms thick. Applied wetness Engineering a surface where this […]

Subscribe to this feed

  • RSS Feed

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *